post-mitotic:

colored radiograph of a bat’s thorax and head
why?
one word: cochlea
look at them
considering the human cochlea can sit comfortably on a penny, relative to its size, this bat has quite a set
understandably:
these nocturnal mammals are exquisitely sensitive to high frequency sounds, particularly those self-generated for echolocation
in fact, the acoustic features of echolocation calls (frequency modulated sweeps, pulse interval, harmonic composition, etc) allow bats to differentiate between targets just millimeters apart
imagine what a crazy place their auditory cortex must be

post-mitotic:

colored radiograph of a bat’s thorax and head

why?

one word: cochlea

look at them

considering the human cochlea can sit comfortably on a penny, relative to its size, this bat has quite a set

understandably:

these nocturnal mammals are exquisitely sensitive to high frequency sounds, particularly those self-generated for echolocation

in fact, the acoustic features of echolocation calls (frequency modulated sweeps, pulse interval, harmonic composition, etc) allow bats to differentiate between targets just millimeters apart

imagine what a crazy place their auditory cortex must be

(via thegrumpybetta)

I am reading six books at once, the only way of reading; since, as you will agree, one book is only a single unaccompanied note, and to get the full sound, one needs ten others at the same time.

Virginia Woolf (via observando)
talesofscienceandlove:

Cross section of flower ovary by Ray Nelson, photomicrographer, 100x magnification, Dark Field Microscopy
Flowers are beautiful and quite inspirational as we find them presented out in nature. But there is more hidden within a flower. This image by microphotographer Ray Nelson is actually the base, or ovary, of a flower. Yes, its been enhanced using stain and special lighting, but the pattern and texture is all Mother Nature.
These microphotographs were taken with an American Optical (AO) One Hundred microscope by Leica and a Nikon FA camera. Darkfield Illumination occurs when the focal plane of the aperture is filled precisely by a black stop so that no light is beamed directly through the aperture.

The stoppage creates a black field, while enough light spills around the edges of the stop to bounce from the walls of the objective lens and strike the specimen from oblique angles. This method allows otherwise translucent specimens to be seen clearly and creates in stained specimens a much richer and colorful lighting than would be accessible with brightfield illumination.
Source, Source, Source

talesofscienceandlove:

Cross section of flower ovary by Ray Nelson, photomicrographer, 100x magnification, Dark Field Microscopy

Flowers are beautiful and quite inspirational as we find them presented out in nature. But there is more hidden within a flower. This image by microphotographer Ray Nelson is actually the base, or ovary, of a flower. Yes, its been enhanced using stain and special lighting, but the pattern and texture is all Mother Nature.

These microphotographs were taken with an American Optical (AO) One Hundred microscope by Leica and a Nikon FA camera. Darkfield Illumination occurs when the focal plane of the aperture is filled precisely by a black stop so that no light is beamed directly through the aperture.

DarK Field

The stoppage creates a black field, while enough light spills around the edges of the stop to bounce from the walls of the objective lens and strike the specimen from oblique angles. This method allows otherwise translucent specimens to be seen clearly and creates in stained specimens a much richer and colorful lighting than would be accessible with brightfield illumination.

Source, Source, Source

(via catherinebythackeray)